Democracy

The Ladies of Burma

Friday, September 28, 2012

Here I present two videos featuring two women doing remarkable work toward freedom and democracy for their home country, Burma: the artist Chaw Ei Thein and the Nobel Peace Prize laureate, newly elected Parliamentarian, and chair person of the National League for Democracy, Aung San Suu Kyi (affectionately known as "The Lady").

Why Pussy Riot Is Not The Most Important Political Case In Russia

Thursday, August 23, 2012

In the space of a week, Nadezhda Tolokonnikova, Yekaterina Samutsevich, and Maria Alyokhina have arguably become the world's most famous political prisoners following their sentencing in a Moscow courtroom last Friday.

The Russian Soul Protests

Wednesday, August 15, 2012

by Natasha Yarotskaya

Russia by mind comprehended cannot be

Nor by wide arshins measured:

Its uniqueness be that—

#SudanRevolts: A Young Journalist's Perspective

Friday, July 13, 2012

Known on Twitter simply by the hashtag #SudanRevolts, the protests that erupted in Khartoum nearly a month ago now do not seem to be fading. In fact, the movement is gaining momentum, with those involved hoping to finally see real change in the country. Calling for the removal of current President Omar al-Bashir (among other demands), the movement’s goals are ambitious to say the least. Yet as daunting as it may seem, success is crucial both for the people of Sudan and their new neighbor South Sudan.

Licking your Elbow: Sudan’s Arab Spring Revival

Thursday, July 12, 2012

Sudan’s most recent spate of demonstrations that began on 16 June at the University of Khartoum and have since spread across the country have been a long time coming. Similar student demonstrations began in late January 2011 and were revived in January 2012. Both were met with strong crackdowns by police and the National Intelligence and Security Services (NISS).

Occupy Moscow: Attention, but Little Traction

Thursday, June 7, 2012

 

Photo: Shutterstock

by Maria Brock and Natasha Yarotskaya

Connecting the Dots – and Woes – of Slovakia, Hungary ... and China?

Tuesday, March 20, 2012

MASERU, Lesotho – Last week was one filled with nostalgia and melancholy.

A Copper Bullet For American Democracy?

Friday, February 17, 2012

Earlier this week, the team from Zambia won the Africa Cup of Nations soccer tournament.  The Zambian side, known as the Chipolopolo, or Copper Bullets, were an underdog in the 16 team field.  Their victory over the heavily-favored Cote d'Ivoire side was a thrilling enough outcome, but that it happened in Libreville, Gabon, where a generation earlier Zambia's entire national team had been wiped out in an airplane crash proved to be nothing short of a national catharsis.

Who is Watching Whom?

The End of the Benevolent Dictator

Tuesday, February 7, 2012

In 458 B.C.E., Lucius Quinctius Cincinnatus—at the request of high ranking officials—came out of retirement to rule as Roman dictator. The Aequians, who lived in the central Appennines of Italy, were fighting for their independence from Rome. The capital was in danger of losing control.

twitter logoFacebook logo