Gender

To Their Own Beats

More Sinned Against than Sinning

Friday, June 1, 2012

Sudan Condemns Woman to Death by Stoning

 

Too Taboo to Address?

Monday, October 31, 2011

A population-based assessment completed recently by the Journal of the American Medical Association found that nearly 40% of women and 23% of men in three Eastern provinces of the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) had been subjected to gender based violence (GBV) since conflict reignited in the mid-1990s. Though some INGOs operational in the region have questioned the methodology of the survey, no one has questioned the existence of GBV against men.

Off Balance

Friday, June 24, 2011

by Samantha Chu. Originally published by our partner site, World Policy Blog.

Justice for Women in the New Sudans

Wednesday, February 9, 2011

The secession of Southern Sudan following the referendum on self-determination is imminent. Despite the 2005 Comprehensive Peace Agreement (CPA) prescribing an interim period with a programme of legal reform to address long-standing grievances, no real, conscientious efforts were made to make unity realistic for southerners.

Take Back the Night 2010 in New York City

Friday, June 18, 2010

For the second time in my life I participated in the global movement entitled Take Back the Night (TBTN). It aims to end sexual violence especially against women, but our group at The New School (and many others) opens it up to simply fight gender based violence.

To give you a better understanding of TBTN I first would like to share a quote with you from the official website of the movement: http://www.takebackthenight.org/

“Why Take Back the Night?

Czech Education, In Three Acts

Friday, May 14, 2010

PRAGUE, Czech Republic – Beyond the fact that Prague is one of Europe’s great cities, you can’t walk down a street here – or anywhere in ex-Communist Eastern Europe, for that matter – and not spot a metaphor that illuminates how dramatically life has changed here, twenty years later.

And if I didn’t have this blog, there’d be no one for me to tell. (Sniff, sniff.)

PEN 2010: Writing Inside, Writing Outside

Monday, May 3, 2010

Prison writing is an ambiguous term, one that lends itself to the image of a tattered prisoner huddled in the corner of a dank cell in a forgotten prison in a small American town, writing on a soiled notepad and well-cordoned off from the rest of society. But this perhaps romantic notion of the writer while imprisoned quickly gave way Friday night to the harsh realities of writing as one of the last remaining links to sanity for the incarcerated in a system which practices and inflicts anything but.

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