Literature

Finding Sisyphus in 'Chile'

Wednesday, July 2, 2014

The Idleness of Sisyphus (1981) by Sandro Chia

He was sixteen—or maybe he was eighteen—years-old when he started stealing paperback books in Mexico City. Books by Max Beerbohm, Samuel Pepys, Amado Nervo, and others were purloined by this bookworm. It’s hard to tell which of these writers had a lasting effect on the teenager who would become one of Latin America’s literary giants.

Thought Scores / 8

Monday, June 9, 2014

Untitled (2014) by Julie Maroh; acrylic on paper

This one is for my friends, who understand this madness.

PEN 2014: Going Beyond the Pity in War Literature

Wednesday, May 7, 2014

Erich Maria Remarque

The following commentary was presented at the “Writing War” panel discussion on May 1, as part of the PEN World Voices Festival of International Literature.

 

PEN 2014: Is There Such a Thing as Anti-War Literature?

Saturday, May 3, 2014

Still from the movie version of All Quiet on the Western Front (1930)

PEN 2014: The Death and Life of Theory

Friday, May 2, 2014

The death of theory, not unlike the end of history, has, in the second decade of the twenty-first century, been exposed as an embarrassingly premature announcement.

PEN 2014: There Is No Literary Culture in Jamaica

Wednesday, April 30, 2014

I found myself on a windy and rainy evening at the Westbeth Center for the Arts, a massive warren of beautiful apartments crammed full of writers, dancers, visual artists, actors, poets, and other artistic folks. For what the PEN World Voices Festival deemed a Literary Safari, several of these creative-types opened their apartments and hosted visiting writers in mini-salons, where the scribes read for fifteen minutes and answered questions for another fifteen, and then whoosh! Off you go to find someone else’s apartment (crammed floor-to-ceiling with eclectic art) to engage another writer from another faraway land.

In Conversation with George Prochnik: On Why Stefan Zweig Matters Today

Corona: The Soundtrack

Monday, April 14, 2014

Corona is a poetic on-the-road adventure comedy told by me, Razia Mirza, a Pakistani woman from Corona, Queens. When I was ex-communicated from my Muslim community, I hit the road thinking I could live like the Beats.

The Literary Journal as Community Builder

Monday, March 31, 2014

The world does not need another literary journal.

This might seem like an odd statement from someone who started a literary journal eighteen months ago. Perhaps I should add a “just” in that statement. The world does not need just another literary journal. It’s time for the literary journal to be more than just a book on a shelf or digital real estate on the Internet.

Nothing to be Ashamed About

Tuesday, August 13, 2013

A Short Tale of Shame (Open Letter, 2013) is the first full-length novel from Bulgarian short story writer and critic Angel Igov. Ostensibly it is the story of the damaging connections shared by aged rocker—Boril Krustev—and a tight-knit threesome of high school graduates: Sirma, Maya, and Spartacus. Really, the emotions run deeper than any past misdeed may suggest.

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